The ADA just released its new guidelines for pediatric type 2 diabetes…

The ADA just released its new guidelines for pediatric type 2 diabetes…

The ADA just released its new guidelines for pediatric type 2 diabetes.
 
 
The ADA just doesn’t get it. And I’m worried they never will.
 
Directly from the document:
 
“In youth-onset type 2 diabetes, the major modifiable risk factors are obesity and lifestyle habits of excess nutritional intake, low physical activity, and increased sedentary behaviors with decreased energy expenditure, resulting in the surplus of energy being stored as body fat.”
 
Their own words — it’s still about calories in, calories out. And in the nutrition section, it’s about weight loss and management. The words “diet” or “sugar” or “processed food” aren’t even mentioned. Forget that our group turned insulin resistance around in children just by  getting rid of liver fat by replacing sugar with starch. Forget that Virta Health has reversed Type 2 diabetes with a ketogenic diet, to the point where they are changing their business model to put their profits “at risk” based on diabetes reversal.

 

Worst yet, the authors are my Pediatric Endocrine academic colleagues. They should know better. I’m supremely disappointed in them.

 
 
The ADA is a “bought” organization. Bought by Big Pharma. It’s only about the money. It’s not about lives or health or society. This is extortion. Big Food is Al Capone. And the ADA is Frank Nitti, his henchman (photo above).
Butter Battle 2.0

Butter Battle 2.0

The Guardian enters “The Butter Battle 2.0”.  More heat than light.

Here are the 10 things everyone need to know to navigate this minefield.

  1. LDL-Cholesterol (LDL-C) levels (from dietary fat) correlate (but poorly) with CV mortality.
  2. Triglyceride levels (from dietary sugar) correlate (much better) with CV mortality.
  3. LDL particle number (LDL-P) is the right measure for CVD, and higher is worse. But a standard lipid profile measures LDL-C, not LDL-P. Wrong test.
  4. Dietary fat raises LDL-C, but not necessarily LDL-P, while sugar raises triglyceride levels.
  5. Red meat is associated with increased CVD. But maybe not because of its saturated fat. In fact, dairy saturated fat is protective against CVD.
  6. If you have a super high LDL-C (over 200), then you probably also have a high LDL-P, and you might need a statin.
  7. If your LDL-C is between 70 and 200, maybe your LDL-P is high, but maybe it is not. Statins are not prescribed based on LDL-P; they are prescribed based on LDL-C. This is a bad idea, yet doctors do it all the time.
  8. 4/5 of the people taking statins were prescribed for high LDL-C. But this is the wrong reason. And 20% of statin takers get side-effects.
  9. That doesn’t mean you should stop your statin. But it also doesn’t mean you can eat butter without abandon. 
  10. A doctor who knows what they are doing can figure your situation out. But most don’t know what they are doing; they do as they’re told.

Reference:

Fiber

Fiber

There are two kinds of fiber. Soluble (e.g. pectins, inulin), and insoluble (cellulose). You need both. When you have both, 6 good things happen:

  1. The insoluble fiber forms a latticework in the duodenum, and the soluble fiber plugs the holes in the latticework to create an impenetrable secondary barrier. This limits simple carbohydrate absorption in the duodenum, thus preventing the liver from receiving all that carbohydrate at once, tamping out the tsunami of carbohydrate.
  2. This also reduces the glycemic excursion in the blood, so that the insulin response will be attenuated.
  3. If the carbohydrate isn’t absorbed in the duodenum, it goes to the jejunum, where the microbiome is, promoting microbial diversity and gut health.
  4. Grains are covered in insoluble fiber (the husk). If you consume them whole and non-pulverized, the enzymes in the intestine have to strip that covering off before the starch is released. That takes a lot of time, and so it happens later in the intestine, so the the bacteria can get to it.
  5. The soluble fiber can be fermented by intestinal bacteria to make short chain fatty acids, which also suppress insulin release and improve gut health.
  6. The insoluble fiber acts like little “scrubbies” on the inside of your colon to remove old and damaged cells, thus reducing risk for colon cancer.

The best fiber is where there is both soluble and insoluble. That’s everything that comes out of the ground — before it’s processed. As soon as it’s processed, it loses many of these six properties.

Photo credit: Fancycrave, Unsplash

Coconut Oil – Poison?

Coconut Oil – Poison?

The recent “news” about Coconut Oil may be inflammatory, but the oil is not.

Well, it’s sure not “poison”. Coconut oil has some palmitic (C16) acid, but also myristic (C14) and lauric (C12) acids. These fatty acids when free (non-esterified) are inflammatory, but in coconut oil they bound to glycerol, they are not “free”. They raise serum LDL levels, but the large buoyant, not the small dense LDL (the bad kind). There are benefits to medium-chain triglycerides (MCT’s), but coconut oil’s fats are larger than MCT’s. So coconut oil is no worse than saturated fat, and saturated fat has been shown to be neutral for CV disease and diabetes.

I am sweet enough

The “I am Sweet Enough” event brings together three world-renowned experts who will explain how and why cutting processed sugar from your diet is one of the best things you can do for your health.

Sunday September 16, 2018 – 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
The Ben Sadowski Auditorium, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto

Brought to you by Renascent, a national leader in treating substance use disorders. Since 1970, Renascent has helped almost 50,000 people, becoming an accredited expert in providing hope and healing to individuals, families, loved ones, communities, and organizations impacted by addiction. Renascent’s Food Addiction Program is the first of its kind in Canada, applying an addiction model of care to help people find peace and freedom from their relationship with food.

Click here to register: https://renascent.ca/iamsweetenough/